APAC: 2017 Programmatic Trends

December 27, 2016 — by Amarita Bansal0


With 2017 around the corner, programmatic continues to grow with digital ad spending reaching record highs yet again. We take a look at what’s trending next year in the programmatic scene across North America, EMEA, LATAM and APAC.

APAC is forecasted to have $1.48 billion smartphone users by 2019, due to a surge in smartphone adoption coming from emerging markets like China and India.



Webinar Recap: Grovo and New Marketing Institute Talk Microlearning

December 22, 2016 — by Julie Gora0


This article originally appears on the Grovo Blog

Just because robots aren’t taking our jobs (yet) doesn’t mean technology isn’t drastically changing the way we do business. Nowhere is that more true than in the marketing and advertising industries. SEO, SEM, programmatic, mobile, social—every time the modern marketer blinks, there is a new ad tech du jour. And with new technology comes the need for new competencies. MediaMath noticed this need early on, which is what led them to partner with Grovo to develop the New Marketing Institute (NMI).

Grovo’s Director of Learning & Innovation, Alex Khurgin, was recently joined by Elise James-Decruise, VP of MediaMath’s New Marketing Institute, for a webinar entitled Technology’s Role in Educational Expansion. Alex and Elise discussed the partnership between Grovo and NMI, how NMI created an effective learning strategy with microlearning, and how anyone can use that framework to build their own effective microlearning strategy for their organization.

If you missed it, you’re in luck! Read on for a recap so you, too, can get started building your own effective microlearning program.

What is microlearning anyways?

There are all sorts of definitions for microlearning out there, but if you want to do it right, you need to do a whole lot more than just create little bits of content and put them in front of people. If you commit to transforming your people, then the true definition of microlearning becomes more specific: a method for changing behaviors through short, spaced out learning experiences timed to points of need.

NMI uses microlearning for training, certification, and their Marketing Engineer Program (MEP). In the ever-evolving world of marketing, microlearning is one of the most cost-effective ways to scale training in new technologies and skills that meets the learner where they are in location, language, learning style and level of experience.

The 4 steps to creating an effective microlearning program:

1. Set expectations

It’s surprising how few organizations take the time to spell out exactly what’s expected of their employees. Define concrete behaviors you expect from any given role or as an outcome to training so that everyone knows what they need to do, when they need to do it, how they need to do it, and everyone at different levels and departments is aware of expected behaviors across the board.

NMI identified their success goals as: expanding program reach to 10 countries worldwide, increasing client satisfaction through their client-centered training approach, getting over 10,000 individuals trained through all of their programs, and celebrating big and small wins. They make sure to take a step back as a team to ensure that they are creating memorable experiences within a training environment every step of the way.

2. Surround the moment

In order to motivate people to engage with and apply training, you need to provide them information at the moment they need it. You can do this by paying attention to when there’s a  powerful moment of need approaching—like Black Friday for customer service reps—and placing the learning in advance of that. Or, you can create a moment of need by launching learning with fanfare—like posters or email—and building excitement around it.

NMI motivates learners by listening to the needs and wants of their learners to create timely content, developing a curriculum that supports a structured path to certification, and creating an experiential environment that gives participants hands-on opportunities to put lessons into practice.

3. Make learning stick

Once you’ve engaged people, you need to make sure the learning they receive actually changes their behaviors: from the moment of inspiration—that “aha moment”—through transformation. Giving them quick, digestible lessons that can be revisited, prompting practice through realistic challenges with realistic consequences, providing feedback, and following up with review and reinforcement are all ways to ensure that your learning actually sticks and behaviors change.

With 100% job placement for participants in their 13-week MEP program, NMI has surely mastered this step. Some of their secrets to making learning stick include bridging the gap between knowledge and experience, creating a learner-centric environment, and staying ahead of the industry trends.

4. Improve outcomes over time

Finally, it’s important to create a feedback loop in order to improve your program over time. Take a step back and assess and report how much behaviors have changed rather than learning metrics such as lesson completions. If you figure out what is and isn’t working, you can easily tweak the program to improve outcomes over time.

The idea and development of NMI came from MediaMath’s desire to fill education and talent gaps throughout the marketing industry, so they are always looking for ways to stay one step ahead of the learner. NMI encourages feedback during and after training and constantly updates their content to ensure it is as meaningful and relevant as possible.

DataDIGITAL MARKETINGMediaPROGRAMMATICTechnologyTrendsUncategorized

Marketing Wiki: Machine Learning

December 8, 2016 — by Jesse Comart0


Machine learning describes the practice of a computer adapting without having to be programmed. The more data that’s fed into the computer program, the smarter it gets. It can make better predictions and continuously evolve without the computer engineer having to make adjustments to the code based on the outputs. Machine learning influences lots of things in our world today, from internet search to voice recognition software.

Machine learning also plays a critical role in marketing!

How does ML learn to improve its performance through practice? As the program gains “practice” with the task, it gets better over time, much like how we humans learn to get better at tasks with experience. For example, an ML program can learn to recognize pictures of cats when shown a sufficiently large number of examples of pictures of “cat” and “not cat.” Or a real-time bidding (RTB) system can learn to predict users’ propensity to convert (i.e. make a purchase) when exposed to an ad, after observing a large number of historical examples of situations where users converted or not.

Why can’t humans do the job? Some things are just outside of our human capabilities, like trying to predict which types of users in what contexts will convert when exposed to ads. Marketing folks might have intuition about what conditions lead to more conversions. But the problem is these intuition-guided rules can be wrong and incomplete. The only way to come up with the right rules is to comb through millions of examples of users converting or not and extract patterns from these, which is precisely what an ML system can do. Such pattern extraction is beyond the capabilities of humans.

So does this mean ML will take our jobs?  No. In fact, machine learning is increasing the number of job opportunities in the field of Data Science. Plus, humans will always be needed to understand the goals and motivations of their clients and the nuances between them.

What’s an example of how an ML program works? Say you’re an ad campaign for a new shoe on the New York Times website. Every time a user visits the website, an ad-serving opportunity arises, and given the features of the ad opportunity (such as time, user demographics, location, browser type, etc.). You want to be able to predict the chance of the user clicking on the ad based on previous data about the anonymous user. A ML program can improve its performance at some task after being trained on a sufficiently large amount of data, without explicit instructions given by a human. And with 500 billion ad opportunities every day, the machines are getting really smart, really fast!

CultureDIGITAL MARKETINGMediaMobilePeoplePROGRAMMATICUncategorized

Employee Spotlight: “I Saw Mobile Coming”

December 2, 2016 — by Amarita Bansal0

From a philosophy and religion major, to touring the country following the Grateful Dead and even becoming a professional canoe guide, Michael Weaver, VP, Product Strategy, Growth Media at MediaMath, never thought he’d end up in the advertising field or digital economy while in college.

“In my dorm, there was one person who had a computer that we all tried to share to write papers on,” said Weaver. “But most of my papers were written on a typewriter!”

Now, Weaver is at the forefront of mobile.

He got his first taste of digital through a friend. “In 1993, a friend of mine who was very involved in the new age of computers was talking about the World Wide Web which we were just coming into familiarity with. So we started a little company out of our apartment where we would go to stores and restaurants offering to build a website for them.”

After his first exposure to the digital landscape, Weaver’s college roommate started his own company called BlueStreak. Here, Weaver was able to go to ad agencies and explain that there’s this thing called the internet.

“I’d have to explain to people that they’re going to need a website and, when that happens, they’re going to want to advertise. And when they advertise, they’re going to need to measure and deliver ads,” said Weaver. “So it was a lot of explaining the future to a lot of ad agencies in that role.”

After BlueStreak, Weaver started his own company Third Screen Media because, he says, “I saw mobile coming.” This was pre-iPhone days, pre-apps, pre-universal SMS, but he saw it coming because it was the future and advertisers were interested. Thereafter, it was sold to AOL, which was known as America Online at the time and after a stint at Microsoft, Weaver landed a job at MediaMath.

“Mobile is necessary. It’s 60 percent of the supply right now coming in to the bid stream, so six out of 10 hits on the internet are basically mobile-first. And if you start to skew towards millennials, its even higher,” said Weaver. “So it’s new and it’s exciting, but it’s not new because people are there. And its funny, I think back on talks and how positioning mobile has changed and it used to be messaging. Now it’s just ubiquitous, and it’s there and it’s the primary way people consume media, and that’s only going to increase.”


Social Countdown to 2017

December 1, 2016 — by Annie Fei0


As 2016 is a coming to a close, the MediaMath team is looking back at the terrific year we’ve had. We’ve had the pleasure of making senior appointments in APAC, attending both Cannes Lions Festival and Dmexco and celebrating our 1 year anniversary at 4 World Trade Center!

We’ll be hosting a Twitter countdown to 2017 by highlighting our favorite moments and milestones of 2016 throughout the month of December, so follow along at @MediaMath, @MediaMathEMEA and @MediaMathAPAC or follow our hashtag, #MMLooksBack2016. You’ll be able to see our year in review and see predictions from our executive team and partners for 2017.

Thank you for continuing to support us in our journey and stay tuned for more to come in 2017!


Monthly Roundup: Top 5 Most Popular Blog Posts for November

November 30, 2016 — by Amarita Bansal0


From utilizing full-funnel programmatic to looking at how data is increasingly playing a role in the world of marketing, check out our top 5 performing blogs for the month of November.

• #1 Full-Funnel Programmatic: An Untapped Opportunity for Marketers 

• #2 Infographic: Programmatic Expansion

• #3 The Future of Data in Programmatic 

• #4 5 Questions About Programmatic Creative

• #5 Why Millennials Are More Likely to Block Ads — and What You Can Do About It 


North America: 2017 Programmatic Trends

November 29, 2016 — by Amarita Bansal0


With 2017 around the corner, programmatic continues to grow with digital ad spending reaching record highs yet again. We take a look at what’s trending next year in the programmatic scene across North America, EMEA, LATAM and APAC. First, we take a look at North America where programmatic mobile video ad spending is expected to represent over half of total programmatic ad spending in the US alone.